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Some millionaires want to be taxed to pay for COVID-19 aid

More than 80 wealthy individuals signed an open letter asking the United States and other countries to raise taxes on rich people "immediately" and "permanently" to pay for aid needed to help poor people survive the COVID-19 pandemic.
Abigail Disney, the Disney heiress, was inspired to go undercover at Disneyland after a worker Facebook messaged her about certain conditions. (Source: Wochit)
Abigail Disney, the Disney heiress, was inspired to go undercover at Disneyland after a worker Facebook messaged her about certain conditions. (Source: Wochit)
Published: Jul. 13, 2020 at 7:59 PM EDT
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(WVLT/CBS) - More than 80 wealthy individuals signed an open letter asking the United States and other countries to raise taxes on rich people “immediately” and “permanently” to pay for aid needed to help poor people survive the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The problems caused by, and revealed by, COVID-19 can’t be solved with charity, no matter how generous,” the group, dubbed Millionaires for Humanity, said in a letter. “Government leaders must take the responsibility for raising the funds we need and spending them fairly.”

According to CBS News, the letter adds, “Tax us. Tax us. Tax us. It is the right choice. It is the only choice.”

Despite many states reopening and rehiring workers, CBS reported that unemployment stood at 11.1 percent in June, higher than the peak jobless rate during the Great Recession, and extra unemployment benefits of $600 are set to end the week of July 25. CBS reported that as many as 23 million US families face the risk of eviction.

Among those who signed the letter were Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream co-founder Jerry Greenfield and Walt Disney Co. heiress Abigail Disney. The letter comes two years after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act went into effect, which provided cuts to many wealthy Americans.

"Unlike tens of millions of people around the world, we do not have to worry about losing our jobs, our homes, or our ability to support our families," the letter noted. "We are not fighting on the front lines of this emergency and we are much less likely to be its victims."

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