‘My second home:’ Hindman native collecting donations for her hometown

Knott County has not only seen tremendous devastation from flooding, but has also endured great loss.
Published: Aug. 3, 2022 at 10:07 PM EDT
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KNOTT COUNTY, Ky. (WKYT) - Knott County has not only seen tremendous devastation from flooding, but has also endured great loss.

Seventeen people were killed there. Help for that small community is being organized here in central Kentucky by a woman who grew up on those same streets that were flooded.

Before the waters receded, Hindman in Knott County was virtually unrecognizable.

“I just couldn’t believe it was my town,” said Cassie Moses.

Last week Moses woke up to the news that much of eastern Kentucky had flooded and 137 miles away, her beloved Hindman was under water.

“The water came down Main St., the one street in Hindman so high it busted out the windows in the businesses and just destroyed them,” said Moses.

Moses, who lives in Cynthiana, now calls it her second home, but Knott County is where her heart remains. One of the places that saw damage, the Hindman Settlement School, is the historic beacon of education in the mountains, and a place Moses knows well. Her late father, Mike Mullins, was the director there, and one of the buildings is named after him.

“I grew up on that campus. It wasn’t just where my dad worked. Like I got off the bus there every day after school. So I consider the Hindman Settlement School my second home,” said Moses.

Moses knew she needed to help, so she started immediately gathering supplies.

“People were like, ‘can I send you money, can I do this,’ so I was like I’m going to pack my minivan full of food and water to get to the Settlement School because people are coming there to stay who are homeless,” said Moses.

She also saw some of her central Kentucky friends pack up and head east this past weekend, driving straight for the Settlement School to help clean up.

“And I just thought maybe people would help me buy like some water, well it just escalated, and it blew my mind,” said Moses.

Moses has now seen her second hometown of Cynthiana jump on board. It’s a place that knows flooding all too well, and donations are being collected in an old school bus in hopes of filling it with the essential items like water, cleaning supplies and baby wipes.

For Moses, her heart is heavy for her beloved Hindman, but it’s what she sees in complete strangers doing for a region she loves, that lifts it again.

“What it all comes down to is we are all just humans and we need to help each other,” said Moses.

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