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Astronaut talks to WVLT about the future of space

A SpaceX Falcon 9, with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken in the Dragon crew capsule, prepare to lifts off as the vehicle vents fuel, from Pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, May 30, 2020. The two astronauts are on the SpaceX test flight to the International Space Station. For the first time in nearly a decade, astronauts will blast towards orbit aboard an American rocket from American soil, a first for a private company. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
A SpaceX Falcon 9, with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken in the Dragon crew capsule, prepare to lifts off as the vehicle vents fuel, from Pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, May 30, 2020. The two astronauts are on the SpaceX test flight to the International Space Station. For the first time in nearly a decade, astronauts will blast towards orbit aboard an American rocket from American soil, a first for a private company. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)(WVLT)
Published: May. 30, 2020 at 6:58 PM EDT
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Saturday's successful NASA launch brings hope for more space travel in the future. WVLT's Ben Cathey talked to an astronaut about the next generation of spacemen and spacewomen.

"Today, kids all across the country, all over the world, are going to get this first flight of a new spacecraft," said Kjell Lindgren.

He should know: the last time a new ship sent astronauts into zero gravity was 1981 in a Space Shuttle.

"I remember watching that, when I was in second grade. And that's what inspired me to pursue this career," Lindgren said.

The NASA flight surgeon made every kid's dream a reality.

"I spent 141 days living and working in low-earth orbit. I got to do two space walks," Lindgren said. "And then came back to Earth."

But before he hangs up the flight-suit, he's hiring.

"That's a unique time, where we are basically choosing new crew-mates, new teammates, and essentially the future of the astronaut office," Lindgren said.

If you're thinking of getting into the field, you better start studying now. Lindgren said junior astronauts should study STEM.

"We are looking for people who are passionate about their particular disciplines," Lindgren said. "Whether that's engineering, or math, or science."

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