The Latest: Voters weigh in on primary for governor

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT/AP) -- WVLT News staff sat down with governor hopefuls Diane Black, Randy Boyd, Karl Dean, Craig Fitzhugh, Beth Harwell, Bill Lee and Kay White recently to learn more about their platforms.

Their interviews are available in alphabetical order in the above video player. Candidates Basil Marceaux and Mezianne Vale Payne were not available for interviews.



Here's the latest information from the Associated Press on Election Day in Nashville:

6:15 p.m.

Tom Bergschicker, a 53-year-old insurance agent, voted for Randy Boyd in the Republican governor’s race at a church in the Memphis suburb of Collierville.

He says he likes that Boyd he drew the endorsement of former GOP presidential candidate and ex-Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, and that Boyd is a businessman.

Bergschicker says, “He’s a businessman. I’m a businessman. I think it takes a businessman to run things fiscally.”

3:45 p.m.

Linda Humber, a 68-year-old Republican and former city clerk in Alabama who moved to Nashville three years ago, cast her ballot for Marsha Blackburn as the Republican congresswoman pursues her party’s nomination for the U.S. Senate race.

Humber, a Republican, says she voted for Blackburn because she likes her and because of party affiliation. Humber says of Blackburn: “I feel like I knew her. She’s out there so much.” Humber also had voted for Donald Trump for president in 2016 and says: “I would do it again.”

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for the U.S. Senate and governor as voters take part in state primary elections Thursday. The ballot also includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

2:30 p.m.

Elaine and Cliff Seltzer are retired New Yorkers who moved to Nashville about a decade ago. They say they are angry about President Donald Trump and voted straight-Democrat ballots on Tennessee’s primary day.

Both saw choosing Democrats as a way to help thwart Trump and change the country’s direction.

Elain Seltzer says, “There was no question that I was going to vote today.” She adds she voted Thursday for former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen in the U.S. Senate contest and Democrat Karl Dean in the race for governor.

Her husband Cliff says he still doesn’t understand why so many people in the South have voted for Trump.

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for governor and U.S. Senate as voters take part in state primary elections. The ballot also includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

12:30 p.m.

Nashville voter Robert Crowell says he voted for U.S. Rep. Diane Black in Tennessee’s governor’s race because he had seen her on television talking about her platform.

He says he voted for candidates, like Black, who agree with President Donald Trump on issues like having a strong national defense and protecting America’s borders.

Other GOP front-runners vying to succeed popular term-limited Republican Gov. Bill Haslam include state House Speaker Beth Harwell, former state economic development Commissioner Randy Boyd and businessman Bill Lee.

The two leading Democrats are former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and state House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh.

11:30 a.m.

Voter Diane Dimel said Thursday outside her Nashville polling place that she’s a registered Republican and cast her ballot for state House Speaker Beth Harwell in the governor’s race, but she probably won’t vote that way in the general election.

Dimel said she decided against U.S. Rep. Diane Black after seeing her ads with President Donald Trump. Dimel said she voted for Trump in a tough decision but no longer supports him.

Looking to the general election, Dimel said she would likely change her party affiliation and vote for a Democratic governor.

Other GOP front-runners vying to succeed popular term-limited Republican Gov. Bill Haslam include former state economic development Commissioner Randy Boyd and businessman Bill Lee. The two leading Democrats are former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and state House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh.

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11 a.m.

Gov. Bill Haslam is touting Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn’s candidacy for U.S. Senate, saying the race is about who voters want to control the Senate.

At a Blackburn campaign event in Brentwood, Haslam told a room of Republicans that their role is to remind people of “the Marsha you’ve known for a long time” and say that the “caricature” that will be drawn of her isn’t really true.

He echoed Blackburn’s comments that if the Democratic majority flips, Democrats start replacing Republicans as committee chairmen.

Her likely opponent, former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen, has contended he doesn’t have a commitment to support Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for majority leader. He has pledged to be an independent voice in the Senate.

Both face only marginal opposition in Thursday’s primary election.

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12:15 a.m.

Key nominations are at stake in Tennessee for open races for governor and U.S. Senate as voters take part in state primary elections.

The ballot includes contests for the U.S. House and the Republican-led General Assembly.

About 626,900 people have already voted early or absentee, a jump of more than 62,000 from the 2014 midterm election. More than six in every 10 early or absentee ballots cast this primary were Republican.